Little Volcano: plate tectonics

Veda Hille, Little Volcano, The Cultch

The power of counterpoint: Veda Hille in Little Volcano (Photo by Emily Cooper)

All alone in my living room, I applauded.

These are lonely times and getting to watch the livestream of Veda Hille’s Little Volcano for 90 minutes is like having the most fascinating person over for the most intimate of conversations. [Read more…]

I Walked the Line: Solidarity, sisters and brothers!

I Walked the Line, Allan Morgan, Firehall Theatre

Allan Morgan really did walk the line when his union was locked out in Burnaby.

Allan Morgan is a big ol’ homo. That’s a big part of why his solo show I Walked the Line is such a glorious celebration of resilience, compassion, and belonging. [Read more…]

Hey Viola! Get a better title!

Krystle Dos Santos, Steve Charles, Viola Desmond

Krystle Dos Santos and Steve Charles are both gifted performers. (Photo by Emily Cooper)

Representation matters. Viola Desmond’s legacy matters. And I’m a white guy who doesn’t think that this telling of Desmond’s story works very well — which is my way of acknowledging that perspective also matters. Please take it into account. [Read more…]

A War of the Worlds: real life is more chilling

@theatreinthedark, #waroftheworlds

There are all sorts of adaptations of H.G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds running around. Maybe some of them will be affecting.

Trump is scarier. Climate change is scarier. Covid is scarier. [Read more…]

The Doll’s House Project: theatrical space isn’t digital space

The Doll's House Project, Studio 58

Theatrical space can look empty on video. Still, this show is strong. (Photo by Amir Tabatabaei)

The Doll’s House Project has huge things going for it, including playwright Henrik Ibsen’s shifting moral perspectives and a gallery of fine performances from a bumper crop of student actors. But Laara Sadiq has directed the piece for the stage even though it’s being delivered primarily online.* [Read more…]

No Child… : Yes, child!

Celia Aloma, Arts Club Theatre, No Child...

Celia Aloma reminds us that live theatre is all about embodiment. (Photo by Moonrider Productions.)

Are you looking for a really good reason to go back to the theatre? Here you go: the Arts Club’s production of Nilaja Sun’s No Child… will remind you what it’s all about. [Read more…]

counterFACTUAL: Maybe FACTUAL would be better

CounterFACTUAL takes place in a (more) dystopian version of Canada.

What? Why?

So much nothing happens in counterFACTUAL that I was genuinely confused when the lights came up. I couldn’t quite believe it was over. Wasn’t there going to be some kind of ending, some kind of resolution or at least an intriguing cliffhanger? But there was a curtain call. People started leaving. It really was the end. [Read more…]

Transform Cabaret Festival Opening Night Bash: Revolutionary. Joy.

#UrbanInk, #TheCultch, #TransformCabaretFestival

Drag artist Le Gateau Chocolat sent a performance from London Thursday night.

Last night’s Opening Night Bash at the Transform Cabaret Festival was … transformative for me. Moreso than last year’s.

I don’t think that’s because this year’s edition was artistically “better”, whatever that means; I think it’s because the overwhelming awfulness of our global crises allowed me to appreciate more fully the power of celebration as resistance. [Read more…]

Incidental Moments of the Day: extraordinary ordinariness

 

In Incidental Moments of the Day, members of the Apple family convene on Soon.

Members of the Apple family enjoy an online dance performance.

 

 

 

 

Incidental Moments of the Day is complex, engaging, and so potentially inflammatory that I want to warn you before you watch it. [Read more…]

Art Heist: nobody knows whodunnit

Art Heist, Vancouver Fringe Festival, TJ Dawe, Ming Hudson

In Art Heist, the art is missing and so is the resolution.

There’s a lot of foreplay in this show and no orgasm.

In Art Heist, playwrights TJ Dawe and Ming Hudson offer an experience in which audiences of up to 10 people sleuth around Granville Island trying to figure out who pulled off a half-billion-dollar theft from Boston’s Isabella Gardner Museum in 1990. There are 13 clues in the form of QR codes (which you hunt like Easter eggs) and there are five folks to interview. Time and space are flexible: a couple of the interviewees are dead; some exist in the present and some in the past. [Read more…]

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