THE ADHD PROJECT

I like any show that makes me cry and, although it also made me laugh, The ADHD Project certainly succeeded on that front.

That’s because it tells the story of an outcast—and who can’t relate? Writer and solo performer Carlyn Rhamey, who has ADHD, was bullied and excluded for much of her school life.

Rhamey is buoyant, however: her charm is a large part of what makes The ADHD Project work. And she responds to the audience with the confidence of a comic pro. For me, the most touching material has to do with her success, as an adult, in easing the way for kids who are struggling with ADHD.

That said, Rhamey could strengthen her script considerably by concentrating less on general information and vague chronological progression and more on specific relationships—with her dad for instance. When Rhamey got frustrated with five-pin bowling as a little kid—the alley was over-stimulating—he suggested she bowl with her eyes closed. She got a strike. The guy’s a genius.

At the False Creek Gym on September 6 (6:30 p.m.), 8 (8:20 p.m.), 12 (5:15 p.m.), 13 (8:25 p.m.), 14 (6:35 p.m.), and 16 (1 p.m.) Tickets > Colin Thomas(This review is based on a performance at the Victoria Fringe.)

 

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About Colin Thomas

Colin Thomas is a Vancouver-based editor, an award-winning playwright, and an established theatre critic. Colin helps writers unlock the full potential of their novels, short stories, screenplays, and children's books.

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