ANGELS & ALIENS

Angels & Aliens: pros and cons.

In Angels & Aliens, co-writers and performers Sydney Hayduk and Jeff Leard take on the personae of friends and roommates Syd and Jeff who have just had sex for the first time. It was awkward. To distract themselves, they play with a new app in which, unbeknownst to them, they are determining in the fate of humanity. He (Jeff) plays for the angels and she (Syd) plays for the aliens.

The alternative realities, in which they become balletic angels and three-fingered aliens are trippy and the transitions between the three worlds are razor-sharp. I loved the surrealism of the pre- and post-show voiceovers: “Every person in this room is a person…Every person in this room is a fireman except they have hopes instead of hoses.”

But, in the historical unfurling—which is the majority of the show—Angels and Aliens runs through the checklist of major events without finding enough comedy (surprise) or content (insight). And I didn’t care about the roommate couple: he’s obtuse and she’s inarticulate.

At Studio 1398 on September 6 (8:30 p.m.), 8 (1 p.m.), 9 (9:30 p.m.), 11 (5:15 p.m.), 15 (6:30 p.m.), and 16 (3 p.m.) Tickets> Colin Thomas(This review is based on a performance at the Victoria Fringe.)

  

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About Colin Thomas

Colin Thomas is a Vancouver-based editor, an award-winning playwright, and an established theatre critic. Colin helps writers unlock the full potential of their novels, short stories, screenplays, and children's books.

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