A Simple Space will make your body sing

A Simple Space, Gravity & Other Myths, the Cultch

The acrobatic circus, A Simple Space, is physically ecstatic

A Simple Space is all about pleasure in the body.

Gravity & Other Myths, the elegantly minimalist acrobatic troupe from Australia is so playfully athletic that the kids in your life will totally—and innocently—dig their show. And A Simple Space is so essentially erotic that you will—innocently—appreciate it on a whole other level. (I mean, really, these folks are hot. Let’s admit that. And celebrate it.)

Their skill level is crazy, and there are thrills to match. The performers go flying through the air and land on one another’s shoulders. They do one-armed handstands on one another’s heads. They climb up one another then hurl themselves into space. They toss one another around like rag dolls.

Buy your tickets now. A Simple Space is at the York Theatre until October 24, but don’t let that lull you into complacency. Once word gets out, this one is going to sell out. So pick up that phone or go to the Cultch’s website. (And, if you can, get seats on the stage.)

 

 

Buy your tickets RIGHT NOW for Empire of the Son

Tetsuro Shigemetsu in Empire of the Son at the Cultch

Testuro Shigemetsu’s solo show, Empire of the Son, is even cooler than this photo—and a lot less scary.

Okay, this is kind of the artistic equivalent of insider trading, but you should buy your tickets for Tetsuro Shigematsu’s Empire of the Son right now before my review is posted online—and before other critics have a chance to chime in and word of mouth hits high gear.

In The Vancouver Sun, Erika Thorkelson has already praised the show, others are bound to follow suit, and, even though the Cultch has extended the run by a full week to October 24, tickets are selling fast and there aren’t many left.

Empire of the Son is about Shigematsu’s relationship with his father, Akira. Like most men in most cultures, they’re part of a lineage of self-containment. Movingly, and with great complexity, this script explores compassion and love.

The writing is gorgeous, and, thanks to Richard Wolfe’s direction, Pam Johnson’s set, Gerald King’s lighting, Steve Charles’s sound design, and Carole Macdonald’s props, the production is superb.

If you try to get tickets tomorrow and they’re sold out, don’t say I didn’t warn you.